christianboyle
10/3/2013 - 1:49 AM

In Defense of Quentin Hardy's Interpretation of the Breaking Bad Finale

In Defense of Quentin Hardy's Interpretation of the Breaking Bad Finale

Reference: http://www.quora.com/Breaking-Bad-Series-Finale-Season-5-Episode-16-Felina/How-do-you-feel-about-the-ending-of-the-series-finale-for-Breaking-Bad/answer/Quentin-Hardy?__snids__=197891090&__nsrc__=1

tl;dr: The finale depicted an altered state of reality (final moments of life) and not actual events in the Breaking Bad world.

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After some reflection, this seems like the correct interpretation for a few reasons:

1. Walt finds the keys. (After a futile attempt at "hot wiring" a vehicle by jamming a screwdriver in the general vicinity of the covered ignition switch.)

2. Walt goes unnoticed, by two patrolling police cars. (They'd certainly check the house and vehicle.)

3. Walt makes it to New Mexico without issue. (While being dressed like a crazy bum.)

4. Walt finds an arms dealer who provides him with a gun that is, to put it lightly, obscure. (And Google'd/printed some instructions, NBD.)

5. Walt gets the Ricin by non-chalantly walking through his unpatrolled and abandoned house. (LOL)

6. Walt talks to Skyler, who is under surveillance and leaves undetected. (During the middle of the day.)

7. Walt goes to Flynn's school and creeps around while looking through the windows of adjacent buildings. (Cameras, various people on guard, etc.)

8. Lydia unwraps a sealed packet of Stevia, which was presumably tainted by Walt, who strolls in, looking like a crazy bum and makes his play. (Todd is, all of a sudden, sitting at the same table and cordial with hints of flirtation while talking to Lydia in a professional setting, a highly idealized situation.) 

9. Walt shields Jesse from a .50cal bullet and enables his revenge on Todd, who is aimlessly looking outside at the guncar. (Unlikely, given his tendency to 'shoot first, ask questions later'.)

10. Walt makes it to the Neo-Nazi lab, with .50cal bullet wound and enjoys his last moments. (Blood loss and complications with cancer alone would rule out his normal abilities after being wounded.)

After seeing all of these outcomes lined up it seems pretty obvious that this was something other than the immediate reality of what Walt experienced. Don't get me wrong, I love the show. It just seems like this theory is accurate and I'd be upset if I hadn't read about it and explained my rationale for supporting it.